Posts filed under ‘Health 2.0’

Holding on to the past…or a finger in the dike?

The world of health care today is much different than the one I became involved in as a physician over 35 years ago. But why should that surprise me? The world in general is so dramatically changed from that which I knew then, it would seem reasonable and totally understandable that we’ve had to make dramatic changes in how we work with the population in maintaining health. Or have we? For it seems to me that in many cases the volume-based, paternalistic, top down, cottage industry approach which served us generations ago still has a strong presence, at least intellectually and emotionally, in many in the medical profession.

Continue Reading March 12, 2012 at 9:26 am

Gary Oftedahl:Thriving, not just surviving, a time for sharing and learning

Slightly over a year ago, I referenced the sense of “drinking from the fire hydrant” in discussing the challenge of incorporating all the information flooding our senses as we work on transforming health care. (http://bit.ly/9ZwdJQ). At the heart of this was an invitation to attend the annual ICSI/IHI Colloquium, as an opportunity to hear from many of those involved in the ongoing efforts. Over 500 of our friends and colleagues–an attendance record–took advantage of that event, which was a great success.

Continue Reading March 16, 2011 at 1:55 pm

Gary Oftedahl: When You’re Too Close to Your iPad..

I think I may have a problem, but it’s not clear exactly what it is, or if it even truly is a concern. I’m not a “techie” so to speak. I have trouble figuring out how to enter the code for my garage door opener without making some fundamental mistake, due to a deficit embedded in my cerebral cortex at some level. But that is not coupled with an associated lack of interest in new technologies, or a fascination with what they might become. In that way, I become a “dangerous student” as new devices are presented to me.

Continue Reading January 31, 2011 at 3:34 pm 2 comments

Gary Oftedahl: The Platform’s Burning–Now What?

In addressing the need for change, there are many metaphors that can be evoked as a call to action. How we get people’s attention, and sustain that, is critical in many projects dealing with change. Whether we’re unfreezing and freezing, transitioning, or incorporating Prochaska’s levels of readiness, there is recognition that we need to create a compelling message to stimulate change.

Continue Reading November 8, 2010 at 2:23 pm 3 comments

Gary Oftedahl: Health Care Innovation–Preparing for the Unexpected

While there are numerous efforts underway to transform the health care system, many of them continue to build on our experiences from the past, attempting to modify programs which have been previously successful in an effort to identify what will be of value in moving into the future.

Continue Reading November 2, 2010 at 8:33 am

Kent Bottles: Is the Internet Good or Bad for You?

Paro the robot baby harp seal was the final straw. I had vowed to myself not to think about or write about “the internet makes you smarter, the internet makes you dumber” argument. Even when some of my favorite authors (Steven B. Johnson, Clay Shirky, Nicholas Carr, and Jonah Lehrer) weighed in, I thought it best not to participate.

Continue Reading June 21, 2010 at 1:36 pm 16 comments

Kent Bottles: The top 10 health care leadership challenges of today (OK, I listed 12)

One of my favorite health care consultants is Al Burgener of Iowa City. Al and I worked closely together years ago at the UIHC, and I have used him as a consultant in Grand Rapids, MI, Des Moines, IA, and Bloomington, MN. Nobody thinks and writes more clearly and creatively about health care reform than Al. He and I were talking about what the real leadership challenges are today, and we came up with the following list:

Continue Reading June 9, 2010 at 4:27 pm 3 comments

Kent Bottles: American Medical Schools Are Not Preparing Students for 21st Century Health Care

Minnesota Department of Health Commissioner Sanne Magnan and Minnesota Department of Human Services Commissioner Cal Ludeman hosted a daylong summit in St. Paul, MN, yesterday on accountable care organizations (ACOs). Harold Miller, the President and CEO of the Network for Regional Healthcare Improvement (http://www.nrhi.org), presented the best overview and analysis of ACOs I have heard. Miller is the author of a comprehensive white paper on the subject that can be accessed at http://www.chqpr.org.

Continue Reading May 19, 2010 at 1:28 pm 5 comments

Gary Oftedahl: Wish you were (had been) here…

My esteemed colleague and leader of ICSI, Kent Bottles (@KentBottles), has highlighted the keynotes from the recent ICSI Colloquium. (http://bit.ly/bwi4N1)

It was my ninth Colloquium as an ICSI staff member, and in my mind the most memorable—for many reasons. The only missing element was…..you….or at least some of you. The energy, the passion, the excitement, the conversations reverberated through the halls, going on long after the sessions ended.

Continue Reading May 12, 2010 at 8:16 am 2 comments

Gary Oftedahl: iPad, iMyGoodness

In what seems to be a distant past post, I expressed my exuberant feelings about my exposure to the iPhone. (http://bit.ly/12j8nH). In the past nine months, my interest in the use of this technology in health care, not to mention life, has continued. It is that interest, aligned with my personal version of ADHD, which now leaves me with more than 160 applications on my iPhone. While many of them are “intellectually inactive,” I continue to ponder the impact of this technology on a non-techie baby boomer like myself.

Continue Reading May 3, 2010 at 8:43 am 8 comments

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